Wikipǣdiamōtung:Nīwlicu word teohhunga

Fram Wikipǣdian
(Edlǣded of NWT)
Gān tō: þurhfōr, sēcan

Try to keep this list in alphabetical order, to make it easier to act as a list of neologisms, for new users, and for easy access. Also be sure to view the neologisms category page for those which are already have articles, as well as the Hū secge iċ? page.

Terms which are basically accepted between all users can be found on the Glēsing Nīƿa Ƿorda page, and terms that you've found in articles which you may not yet understand, can be found here.

Here are the following four vote types:

  • Support
  • Support, with an alternative term as well
  • Oppose, with an alternative term instead
  • Oppose; Anglicize a loan word


A–M

(mōtung) 20:38, 1 Se Æfterra Gēola 2016 (UTC)

  • se beadurinc: soldier, attested in OE and literally means battle-warrior; is unused by this wikia --Urskadamus (mōtung) 17:59, 22 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se cīnæppel: lemon, analogous to German 'Apfelsein' and calque of French pomme de Sine, meaning China-apple --Urskadamus (mōtung) 20:32, 7 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • þæt cīnaglæs: porcelain, literally meaning china-glass and is a calque of Armenian ճենապակի --Urskadamus (mōtung) 03:03, 22 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se cyðere: martyr, is attested in OE, but is unused in this wikia "Ða cwæð se ealdor-biscop to ðam eadigan cyðere, "Is hit swa hí secgað?", Ælfric of Eynsham --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:29, 8 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • sēo dæġbōc: diary, analogous to German Tagebuch; meaning day-book --Urskadamus (mōtung) 23:41, 9 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se flocc: political party, analogous to Modern English flock, meaning taken from Icelandic flokkur--Urskadamus (mōtung) 20:32, 7 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se herealdor: colonel, from Anglic army-elder, calqued from Greek --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:39, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se hlēowcatt: lion, from Anglic lewcat, with lew meaning 'sun' or 'sunny' --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:27, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
The authentic word in the texts in leo. Hogweard (mōtung) 15:42, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
Thanks for telling me; though, I am partial towards hlēowcatt, if nothing else because lēo is a Gallicism. Though I do understand that the meaning and connection is not as obvious as with the latter. What do you think? --Urskadamus (mōtung) 03:36, 13 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • sēo hlēowcatte: lioness, from the above source but with catte (fem.) --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:27, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se hwig: whig, the old political party in England, opposed to the Tory (se Toriġ); is terser than the currently-used and pedantic hwigamor--Urskadamus (mōtung) 21:17, 17 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se līðere: sergeant, analogous to Icelandic liðþjálfi, which literally means runner in both languages; the modern (albeit obsolete) English verb from which it is based is 'lithe' (to go) --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:39, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
I have used werodþegn. The word "sergeant" is from the French sergeant, from the Latin servient. I have never seen a sergeant running when he can get a private to do it. Hogweard (mōtung) 15:42, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
I agree; maybe līðere can be used to mean private instead? --Urskadamus (mōtung) 03:36, 13 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • Sēo Lutherisċe Ċiriċe: The Lutheran Church. --Urskadamus (mōtung) 17:27, 17 Hāligmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • þæt lutherisċ: Lutheran (n.) --Urskadamus (mōtung) 17:27, 17 Hāligmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se mǣġ: parent, attested in OE as well but not in wikia; is irregular, declines like dæġ (long ǣ becomes ā, ġ becomes g in plural: þā māgas)


N–Z
  • Peadrig: Patrick, modelled phonetically, as Heanrig for Henry --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:45, 29 Winterfylleþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se sealtrēam: salsa, literally means salt-cream --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:43, 12 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • sēo slæġhearpa: piano, analogous to Icelandic slagharpa --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:29, 8 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • sēo tealgōs: penguin, analogous to Icelandic mörgæs --Urskadamus (mōtung) 00:29, 8 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se wulfpersoc, se wulfespersoc: tomato, from obsolete English/Anglic wolf's peach --Urskadamus (mōtung) 20:32, 7 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
That's good: the tomato was known as "Wolf peach" when first introduced this side of the ocean.Hogweard (mōtung) 13:24, 28 Hāligmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)
  • se þrōðer: bullet, from Anglic throther, presumably related to Modern English verb throttle --Urskadamus (mōtung) 20:32, 7 Wēodmōnaþ 2017 (UTC)